Hungary is reported to working on a framework to regulate cryptocurrency trading through a joint workgroup set up for this purpose.

The county is currently far from being a crypto haven with steep taxation and a lack of recognition by the country’s ministry of finance and banking system. Despite this stance, the country, like a few others, dabbled with a state cryptocurrency in February due for its Swiss ICO back in March.

The blockchain-based cryptocurrency, the Korona, introduced by the Korona development team and led by Jean-Marc Stiegemeier, a former Wall Street financial adviser, seems to have disappeared from the media as a whole. It appears that this new state crypto didn’t quite make the 26 March deadline due the ICO raising insufficient funds.  The most recent position regarding crypto in Hungary is clarified by this recent ministry statement:

“Hungary is currently looking into regulating crypto instruments, and the central bank, the tax authority, the finance ministry and other authorities have set up a joint workgroup to evaluate legal, economic, law enforcement, money laundering and other aspects of cryptocurrencies with an eye to introducing more detailed regulation.”

Taxation of cryptocurrency in Hungary at 15% is in line with many other countries such as France, who recently revised its rates, with a reduced rate if trading is carried out as part of a business venture, in which case it drops to 9% as corporate income tax.

Hungary has rigid tax laws and because of this nationals latch on to various schemes to get around taxation requirements such as investment schemes which reportedly also carry tax burdens and legal risks. As regards cryptocurrency, there is no tax on gifts or loans so working these into cryptocurrency transactions is reportedly an option for investors.

INLOCK describes itself as a protocol enabling cryptocurrency holders to use their digital assets as collateral for a fiat loan in a safe and regulated environment. Company CEO Csaba Csabai, explains:

“According to current law in Hungary, as a consequence of selling or exchanging cryptocurrencies is considered a taxable event… However, using these digital assets as collateral for a loan to finance a temporary liquidity problem is not. The platform we are building is working towards this concept enabling cryptocurrency holders to access the purchasing power of their holdings without being punished by the extremely high tax rates.”

It remains to be seen if the new workgroup is able to smooth the way for investors and traders in the months to come.

 

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