Reuters reported today that the World Wildlife Fund-Australia (WWF-Australia) has announced the launch of a new blockchain-enabled food tracking system that allows consumers and businesses to check instantly whether their food is green and ethical.

The solution dubbed OpenSC was developed in partnership with BCG Digital Ventures (BCGDV) to help further the cause of preserving wildlife and reduce human activities towards the degradation of the planet’s natural environment. The system is said to be designed to ensure that consumers and food businesses acquire “sustainable and ethical food products”, as well as improve “supply chain accountability and transparency”.

According to the article, head at BCG Digital Ventures in Sydney Paul Hunyor noted that on one end, “those catching and producing things in a very unsustainable way, [find it easy] to hide behind the complexity of supply chains”, and on the other end, it’s difficult for those on the production end to communicate their sincere efforts along the chain.

Using blockchain’s ability to store immutable data, combined with machine learning and RFID technology, the system curbs the illegal acquisition and trade of food products – especially those obtained from wild-life.

While its application extends beyond the wildlife preservation to “anything from food to tissue paper”, the organization touts, the perk hinges on the use of blockchain – an emerging cutting-edge technology with tamper proof quality – by using an ID code stored on the ledger and traceable along the supply chain.

It’s interesting to see how an increasing number of non-virtual companies have found a place for the technology within their operations. In the past year alone, many companies have explored the use of blockchain in supply management, in proofing logistics, and providing more transparency to management structures that rely on data interoperability.

Last year, IBM launched its blockchain-based farm-to-store tracking system in partnership with Walmart and then with Carrefour. United Kingdom Food Services Agency (FSA) piloted the use of blockchain technology in a slaughterhouse. Kerala state in India also combined blockchain with RFID and IoT to monitor milk being delivered to millions across the state.

Blockchain continues to demonstrate how formidable it is in combination with other cutting edge technologies. This goes on to prove that there’s more to the story of blockchain outside the confines of a cryptocurrency tag.

 

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